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Australia

Peregrine Travel is pleased to offer custom tour packages throughout Australia. Please contact us for more information.

Customize your travel

In addition to the tour packages, we are happy to customize tours for you:

  • Add other cities to the packages
  • Extend stays in selected cities
  • Customize an itinerary for you that combine any of the following cities:
    • China, Hong Kong, Japan, Vietnam, Cambodia, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Australia, New Zealand, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Fiji, India and others.

Australia Highlights

  • Bicentennial Park

    Description: Bicentennial Park is a large area of parkland located 16 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of Auburn Council. Bicentennial Park is situated on the shores Homebush Bay and is a part of Sydney Olympic Park, New South Wales. Bicentennial Park is a 40 hectare natural heritage site featuring an important wetland ecosystem and parklands. It offers visitors recreation, nature-based tours, environmental education and outdoor event experiences. The park has picnic areas, playgrounds, pathways and cycle ways, access to the wetlands, salt marsh and bird hides. It also features Lake Belvedere, Peace Monument, Treillage Tower, Sundial, 'Cyrus the Great' statue, the Silent Hearts Memorial Garden and water features. Powells Creek runs through the eastern side of the park.

  • Bondi Beach

    Description: Bondi Beach is a popular beach and the name of the surrounding suburb in Sydney, Australia. Bondi Beach is located 7 kilometres east of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Waverley Council, in the Eastern Suburbs. Bondi, North Bondi and Bondi Junction are neighbouring suburbs. Bondi Beach is about one kilometre long (≈0.6 miles) and receives many visitors throughout the year. Surf Life Saving Australia has given different hazard ratings to Bondi Beach in 2004. While the northern end has been rated a gentle 4 (with 10 as the most hazardous), the southern side is rated as a 7 due to a famous rip current known as the "Backpackers' Express" because of its proximity to the bus stop, and the unwillingness of tourists to walk the length of the beach to safer swimming. The south end of the beach is generally reserved for surfboard riding. Yellow and red flags define safe swimming areas, and visitors are advised to swim between them.

  • Centre Place

    Description: Centre Place is a busy laneway and arcade in the Melbourne CBD, Australia. It runs between Flinders Lane and Collins Street. The laneway is home to several vibrant bars, cafes, restaurants, boutiques, sushi bars and shops, as well as some of Melbourne's best examples of street art and graffiti, particularly stencil graffiti, known as "City Lights". This precinct has been used in tourist promotion campaigns for the city. It is also a popular hangout for Melbourne punks.

  • Cottesloe

    Description: Cottesloe is a western suburb of Perth, Western Australia. Its Local Government Area is the Town of Cottesloe. Cottesloe was home to Australian Prime Minister John Curtin. The house he built still stands in Jarrad Street. It is now vested jointly in the National Trust of Australia (WA) and Curtin University. Cottesloe is a beach-side suburb of the city of Perth in Western Australia. It is located roughly halfway between Perth central business district and the port of Fremantle. It is famous for its beaches, cafes and relaxed lifestyle.

  • Eureka Tower

    Description: Eureka Tower is a 297.3-metre (975 ft) skyscraper located in the Southbank precinct of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Construction began in August 2002 and the exterior completed on 1 June 2006. The plaza was finished in June 2006 and the building was officially opened on 11 October 2006. The project was designed by Melbourne architectural firm Fender Katsalidis Architects and was built by Grocon (Grollo Australia). The developer of the tower was Eureka Tower Pty Ltd, a joint venture consisting of Daniel Grollo (Grocon), investor Tab Fried and one of the Tower's architects Nonda Katsalidis. It was the world's tallest residential tower when measured to its highest floor, until surpassed by Ocean Heights and the HHHR Tower in Dubai. It is now the sixth-tallest after the two Dubai skyscrapers HHHR Tower and Ocean Heights. The observation deck (Eureka Skydeck 88) occupies the entire 88th floor of the Eureka Tower and is the highest public vantage point in a building in the Southern Hemisphere at 285 m (935 ft). It opened to the public on 15 May 2007. An entry fee applies to access the Skydeck.

  • Flinders Street Station

    Description: Flinders Street Station is the central railway station of the suburban railway network of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It is on the corner of Flinders and Swanston Streets next to the Yarra River in the heart of the city, stretching from Swanston Street to Queen Street and covering two city blocks.Each weekday, over 110,000 commuters[1] and 1,500 trains pass through the station. It is the most used metropolitan railway station in Melbourne, in 2009 there was an average of 85,100 passenger boardings per day.[2] Flinders Street is serviced by Metro's suburban services, and V/Line regional services to Gippsland.Flinders Street Station is a cultural icon to Melbourne,[3] frequently used in imagery representing the city. The Melburnian idiom "I'll meet you under the clocks" referring to the row of clocks above the main entrance, which indicate the departure time of the next train on each line; another idiom "I'll meet you on the steps", refers to the wide staircase underneath these clocks. The area is a popular meeting place as it is at the intersection of two of the city's busiest thoroughfares. The station is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register.

  • Fremantle Prison

    Description: Fremantle Prison is a former Australian prison located in The Terrace, Fremantle, in Western Australia. The 6-hectare (15-acre) site includes the prison, gatehouse, perimeter walls, cottages, tunnels, and prisoner art. The prison was one of 11 former convict sites in Australia inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2010 as the Australian Convict Sites. The prison was built by convict labour in the 1850s, and transferred to the colonial government in 1886 for use as a gaol for locally-sentenced prisoners. It closed as a prison in 1991 and reopened as a historic site. It is now a public museum, managed by the Government of Western Australia with daily and nightly tours being operated. Some tours include information about the possible existence of ghosts within the prison. There are also tours of the flooded tunnels and aqueducts under the prison. The prison is also widely referred to as Fremantle Gaol.

  • Kings Park

    Description: Kings Park is a 4.06-square-kilometre (1,003-acre) park located on the western edge of Perth, Western Australia central business district. The park is a mixture of grassed parkland, botanical gardens and natural bush land on Mount Eliza with two thirds of the grounds conserved as native bush land. With panoramic views of the Swan River and Darling Range, it is home to over 300 native plant varieties and 80 bird species. It overlooks the city as well as Perth Water and Melville Water on the Swan River. In 1872 it became the first park to be designated for public use in Australia. It is the largest inner city park in the world and the most popular visitor destination in Western Australia, being visited by over five million people each year. The park is larger than New York's Central Park which is 3.41 km².Besides tourist facilities Kings Park contains the State War Memorial, the Royal Kings Park Tennis club and a reservoir. The streets are tree lined with individual plaques dedicated by family members to Western Australian service men and women who died in World War I and World War II. During September of each year Kings Park hosts Australia's largest wildflower show and exhibition - the Kings Park Festival.

  • Martin Place

    Description: Martin Place, formerly known as Moore Street, is a pedestrian mall in the central business district of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Home to the Reserve Bank of Australia, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Macquarie Bank and other corporations, Martin Place is synonymous with corporate Australia. The Sydney GPO and the Seven Network's Sydney news centre are also located on Martin Place. Martin Place has become a national Australian icon in popular culture for attracting high-end film and television productions and actors to the area. Martin Place runs between George Street and Macquarie Street, and provides entrances to the Martin Place railway station below street level. Other cross streets includes Pitt Street, Castlereagh Street, Elizabeth Street and Phillip Street. Martin Place was opened in 1891 and was named in honour of Sir James Martin, the three time Premier of New South Wales and Chief Justice of Supreme Court of New South Wales

  • Melbourne Museum

    Description: Melbourne Museum is located in the Carlton Gardens in Melbourne, Australia, adjacent the Royal Exhibition Building. It is the largest museum in the Southern Hemisphere, and is a venue of Museum Victoria, which also operates the Immigration Museum and Science works Museum. The museum has seven main galleries, a Children's Gallery and a temporary exhibit gallery on three levels, Upper, Ground and Lower Level and was constructed by Baulderstone Hornibrook. The Touring Hall is where temporary exhibits are displayed. Past exhibits include mummies from Egypt and dinosaurs from China. The Big Box is part of the Children's Gallery. In addition, the museum has other facilities such as the Sidney Myer Amphitheatre and The Age Theatre. The Discovery Centre, on the Lower Level, is a free public research center. The museum also has a cafe and a souvenir shop. The IMAX Theatre, which is situated on the Lower Level is also part of the museum complex. It shows movies, usually documentary films, in 3-D format.

  • Parliament House

    Description: Parliament House, Perth is located on Harvest Terrace in Perth, Western Australia. An important building of the Government of Western Australia, it is the home of the Parliament of Western Australia, including the Western Australian Legislative Council and Western Australian Legislative Assembly. It features Greek Revival architecture elements. Initially, the Legislative Council was housed in the small 1830s Government Offices in St Georges Terrace, and the Legislative Assembly in Howick Street near the Town Hall.[1] An 1897 Royal Commission recommended proposals to house the Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly in the same building, and suggested two possible locations: the site of the existing Legislative Council in St Georges Terrace, and the hill in Harvest Terrace, behind the Barracks.[1] After designs were completed for both sites, the Royal Commission recommended the St Georges Terrace site.[1] Politicians J.W. Hackett and George Leake favoured the Harvest Terrace site, which was eventually chosen by Parliament.

  • Sorrento Beach

    Description: Sorrento Beach is a northern coastal suburb of Perth, the capital city of Western Australia. Its Local Government Area is the City of Joondalup. At its northwestern corner is the Hillarys Boat Harbour, built in the late 1980s. Sorrento is a residential suburb, relying on the Seacrest Village shopping centre for basic commercial services, and Whitford City and Centro Warwick for other services. Several parks of various sizes are situated in the suburb. The Sorrento Quay retail development within the Hillarys Boat Harbour sits on the northwestern boundary of the suburb. Off the coast is the Marmion Marine Park, which provides a home for many species of marine animals.

  • St Georges Terrace

    Description: St Georges Terrace is the main street in the city of Perth, Western Australia. It runs parallel to the Swan River and forms the major arterial road through the central business district. Due to the coincidence between its west-east directions with the prevailing westerlies in Perth weather, it can develop into a successful wind tunnel. Its western end is marked by the Barracks Arch, whereas the eastern end joins Adelaide Terrace at intersection with Victoria Avenue. St Georges Terrace was named for St George's Cathedral. Originally, houses occupied by clergy of the cathedral and lay clerks of the cathedral choir constituted a substantial portion of the Terrace. Some of these houses such as The Deanery remain, however the majority of these were demolished in the 1960s. Set into the footpath along the street are 150 bronze tablets commemorating notable figures in Western Australia's history. These were installed in 1979, as part of the WAY 1979 celebrations, marking the state's 150th, or sesquicentennial year of European settlement.

  • Sydney Tower Eye

    Description: Sydney Tower Eye (also known as the Sydney Tower, AMP Tower, Westfield Centrepoint Tower, Centrepoint Tower or just Centrepoint) is Sydney's tallest free-standing structure, and the second tallest in Australia (with the Q1 building on the Gold Coast being the tallest). It is also the second tallest observation tower in the Southern Hemisphere (after Auckland's Sky Tower, though Sydney Tower Eye's main observation deck is almost 50 m (164 ft) higher than that of Auckland's Sky Tower). The tower is open to the public, and is one of the most prominent tourist attractions in the city, being visible from a number of vantage points throughout town and from adjoining suburbs. While AMP managed the Centrepoint shopping centre, the tower was officially referred to as "AMP Tower". After the Westfield Group took over ownership of Centrepoint in December 2001, the name was changed to Sydney Tower.

  • The Bolte Bridge

    Description: The Bolte Bridge is a large twin Cantilever bridge in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It spans the Yarra River and Victoria Harbour in the Docklands precinct to the west of the Melbourne CBD. It forms part of the CityLink system of toll roads that connects the Tullamarine Freeway from the northern suburbs with the West Gate Freeway and the Domain and Burnley tunnels to the Monash Freeway and the south eastern suburbs. The bridge features two 90 metre (295.2 ft) high silver towers, situated on either side of the roadway at the midpoint of the bridge's span. These two towers are an aesthetic addition by the architects, and are not joined to the main body of the bridge.[1] These towers are hollow, and feature access ladders to a small roof top hatch. Until locked and surrounded by water, these towers were a popular target for urban explorers.It has four spans with two main spans of 173 metres (567.6 ft) and side spans of 72 metres (236.2 ft), giving an overall bridge length of 490 metres (1,607.6 ft). The bridge supports six lanes of automobile traffic.

  • The Burswood Entertainment Complex

    Description: The Burswood Entertainment Complex is located on the Swan River near the city of Perth, Western Australia, and is owned by Crown Limited. The complex includes a 24-hour casino, seven restaurants, eight bars, a nightclub, two international hotels (a luxury 5-star InterContinental and a 4-star Holiday Inn), a Convention Centre, Theatre and the Burswood Dome. Burswood Train Station, near the Burswood Dome, provides a public transport link to the Perth CBD. The area surrounding the Casino is known as Burswood Park and is managed by the Burswood Park Board. Originally a rubbish tip from the mid 1940s, the construction of the casino complex also saw the parklands regenerated into a public recreational facility. Today the park contains wildflower displays, a heritage trail with various statues, and the Burswood Park Public Golf Course.

  • The Old Melbourne Gaol

    Description: The Old Melbourne Gaol is a museum and former prison located in Russell Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It consists of a bluestone building and courtyard, and is located next to the old City Police Watch House and City Courts buildings. It was first constructed starting in 1839, and during its operation as a prison between 1845 and 1924, it held and executed some of Australia's most notorious criminals, including bushranger Ned Kelly and serial killer Frederick Bailey Deeming. In total, 135 people were executed by hanging. Though it was used briefly during World War II, it formally ceased operating as a prison in 1924; with parts of the gaol being incorporated into the RMIT University, and the rest becoming a museum. The three-story museum displays information and memorabilia of the prisoners and staff, including death masks of the executed criminals. At one time the museum displayed Ned Kelly's skull, before it was stolen in 1978; as well as the pencil used by wrongly convicted Colin Campbell Ross to protest his innocence in writing, before being executed.

  • The Royal Botanic Gardens

    Description: The Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne is internationally renowned botanical gardens located near the center of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, on the south bank of the Yarra River. They are 38 hectares of landscaped gardens consisting of a mix of native and non-native vegetation including over 10,000 individual species. They are widely regarded as the finest botanical gardens in Australia, and among the best in the world. However, the gardens are also noted for their historical contribution to the introduction of invasive species. The Royal Botanic Gardens have a second division in the outer Melbourne suburb of Cranbourne, some 45 km south-east of the city. The 363 hectare Royal Botanic Gardens, Cranbourne have a focus solely on Australian native plants, and feature an award-winning special section called the Australian Garden, which was opened in May 2006.The Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne are adjacent to a larger group of parklands directly south-east of the city, between St. Kilda Road and the Yarra River known as the Domain Parklands, which includes; Kings Domain, Alexandra Gardens, and Queen Victoria Gardens.

  • The Royal Exhibition Building

    Description: The Royal Exhibition Building is a World Heritage Site-listed building in Melbourne, Australia, completed in 1880. It is located at 9 Nicholson Street in the Carlton Gardens, flanked by Victoria, Nicholson, Carlton and Rathdowne Streets, at the north-eastern edge of the central business district. It was built to host the Melbourne International Exhibition in 1880-1881 and later hosted the opening of the first Parliament of Australia in 1901. Throughout the 20th century smaller sections and wings of the building were subject to demolition and fire; however the main building, known as the Great Hall, survived. It received restoration throughout the 1990s and in 2004 became the first building in Australia to be awarded UNESCO World Heritage status, being one of the last remaining major 19th century exhibition buildings in the world. It sits adjacent to the Melbourne Museum and is the largest item in Museum Victoria's collection. Today, the building hosts various exhibitions and other events and is closely tied with events at the Melbourne Museum.

  • The Swan Bells

    Description: The Swan Bells are a set of eighteen bells hanging in a specially built 82.5 metres (271 ft)-high copper and glass campanile, commonly known as The Bell Tower or the Swan Bell Tower, in Perth, Western Australia. Taking their name from the Swan River, which their tower overlooks, and forming a sixteen-bell peal with two extra chromatic notes, they are one of the largest sets of change ringing bells in the world. The site is now a tourist attraction for the City; since its opening on December 10, 2000, 1 million people have visited.

  • The Sydney Central Business District

    Description: The Sydney Central Business District (CBD and popularly referred to as the City) is the main commercial centre of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It extends southwards for about 3 kilometers from Sydney Cove, the point of first European settlement. Its north–south axis runs from Circular Quay in the north to Central railway station in the south. Its east–west axis runs from a chain of parkland that includes Hyde Park, The Domain, Royal Botanic Gardens and Farm Cove on Sydney Harbour in the east; to Darling Harbour and the Western Distributor in the west. The Sydney central business district is also sometimes used loosely to encompass the surrounding suburbs such as Pyrmont and Woolloomooloo.

  • The Sydney Harbour Bridge

    Description: The Sydney Harbour Bridge Pylon Lookout is steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of both Sydney and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed "The Coathanger" because of its arch-based design.Under the directions of Dr J.J.C. Bradfield of the NSW Department of Public Works, the bridge was designed and built by English firm Dorman Long and Co Ltd of Middlesbrough, and opened in 1932. According to the Guinness World Records, it is the world's widest long-span bridge. It is also the fifth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world, and it is the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 metres (440 ft) from top to water level.[4] Until 1967 the Harbour Bridge was Sydney's tallest structure.

  • The Sydney Opera House

    Description: The Sydney Opera House is a multi-venue performing arts centre in the Australian city of Sydney. It was conceived and largely built by Danish architect Jørn Utzon, finally opening in 1973 after a long gestation starting with his competition-winning design in 1957. Utzon received the Pritzker Prize, architecture's highest honor, in 2003. The Pritzker Prize citation stated: The Sydney Opera House was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site on 28 June 2007. It is one of the 20th century's most distinctive buildings and one of the most famous performing arts centers in the world. The Sydney Opera House is situated on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour, close to the Sydney Harbour Bridge. It sits at the northeastern tip of the Sydney central business district (the CBD), surrounded on three sides by the harbour (Sydney Cove and Farm Cove) and neighbored by the Royal Botanic Gardens.

  • Vaucluse

    Description: Vaucluse is an eastern suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Vaucluse is located 8 kilometres (5 mi) north-east of the Sydney central business district, in the local government areas of Waverley Council and the Municipality of Woollahra. Vaucluse is located on the South Head peninsula, with Sydney Harbour on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east. The Sydney Harbour side of the suburb commands views across the harbour to the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The adjacent suburbs are Watsons Bay, to the north and Rose Bay and Dover Heights to the south. Vaucluse is a mainly residential suburb. For many years, it was the most affluent suburb in Sydney and in terms of houses and properties is still in the top five most expensive suburbs. Tahiti, a Hawaiian-style residence in tropical gardens above Hermit Bay, set Australian residential record when it sold to a trio of South Africans (the Krok brothers) for more than $29 million in September 2007.

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